Functional Neurology Through Applied Kinesiology to Help Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Functional Neurology Through Applied Kinesiology to Help Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Applied Kinesiology (AK) is actually a program to evaluate three major components of any disease, condition, or disease. Applied Kinesiology has a basis in evaluating and supporting structural, chemical, and emotional health aspects. Get more information about neurotherapy

 

Created in 1964 by Dr. George Goodheart, Applied Kinesiology has found its way to many different health offices. Medical doctors, dentists, chiropractors, nutritionists, and in some cases veterinarians have identified many Applied Kinesiology tools and approaches to their individual advantage.

Applied Kinesiology, together with proper physical examination, medical history, laboratory tests, as well as other diagnostic procedures, enable healthcare providers to see further with patient presentations through manual muscle testing at work. The patient’s cholonological test, when performed with specificity and understanding of human anatomy and physiology, offers doctors treating the biofeedback version because the patient’s muscle function is altered because many challenges, corrections, and muscle tests are performed.

Although manual muscle testing is performed when using Applied Kinesiology, practitioners simply do not evaluate the strength that muscles can make, but instead evaluate how neural methods control muscle function. Applied Kinesiology is often called “Functional Neurology” because of this.

The nervous system is usually a complex network of neurons and axons that are the main signaling methods in our bodies. Using our neural program, we manage muscle activity with our skeletal muscle tissue and physical cramps, which in turn control our way of walking, standing, throwing balls, and even how our heartbeats are, and how our bowels function. The nervous system also gives insight to the world about us. The sensory nerve interprets vision, sound, touch, smell, and taste. When one of these nerves develops into stress, or dysfunctional then the symptoms have the possibility to be presented. Applied Kinesiology supplies further roads for healthcare providers to evaluate some of the nerves in the body, and rapid response to certain stimuli.

By using nervous techniques and manual muscle testing along with patient clinical presentation, Applied Kinesiologist is able to evaluate certain structural, chemical, and emotional elements against emerging symptoms.

For example, patients present with carpal tunnel syndrome will experience pain, weakness, numbness, tingling and other equivalent symptoms in the hands and forearms due to median nerve irritation. Carpal tunnel syndrome is often the result of trauma, but can occur in the absence of an identified cause. The standard orthopedic test used to diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome attempts to re-create numbness, pain, weakness, and so on by maneuvering the wrist in various positions. Sometimes an x-ray will be taken, or an electrical test with a median nerve will be done through an EMG needle to assess the nerve damage. Furthermore for the test, an Applied Kinesiologist can evaluate other things that contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome. From a nutritional standpoint, vitamin B6 deficiency has been shown to mimic symptoms of the exact same carpal tunnel syndrome. Although surgery, chiropractic manipulation, acupuncture, or other structural approaches may provide short-term relief with symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, they usually have no effect on nutritional deficiencies that may be present. B6 deficiency in association with carpal tunnel syndrome is usually accompanied by discomfort of the joints on the elbows, legs, and knees with leg swelling. For some individuals, carpal tunnel syndrome is clearly a result of further nerve entrapment of the wrist. The nerve runs in the brain, down the spinal cord, out of the spinal cord, and through the extremities as peripheral nerves. The irradiated median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome is often affected in any neurological pathway element. Nerve irritation in the neck, shoulders, elbows or wrists can all contribute to the symptoms that appear. An educated practitioner in Applied Kinesiology may be in a position to assess patients, determine aspects that contribute to emerging symptoms, and use potential patients to provide biofeedback to adapt different treatment protocols to patient needs.

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