At The Note Turned Blue

At The Note Turned Blue

Thom is the youngest of three brothers grown in Northwest Ohio, the son of a father who, for 89 years in the past, is aware of all of his main worldly aspirations. She married her dream girl, a wise boy to carry her family name, recognized as a respectable design engineer, and became a 33rd degree Mason. I dare say there are not many men passing through this veil of life as fulfilled. I know I will not do it. In addition, the father has the artistic ability of Norman Rockwell and is blessed with a lifetime golfing partner for a wife. The only shadow in his years was the unexpected birth of his partner, the victim of Alzheimer’s disease. He remains mentally clever until the end. All in all; A good life as he designed and lived, complete with a martini every day and chain pipe smoking.
Two older boys follow their father’s footsteps – or at least get a bachelor’s and a graduate degree in engineering. Ah, but Thom, the youngest, hears an unusual tone for a different tone, a pure harmonious tone, a tone that someday will be known as the only sound that can bring the human hearts joy; and he went in a different direction-it was too short. His dream is cut off like his mother’s life, but we’ll get there.

At The Note Turned Blue

Meanwhile, the eldest son admired his sister’s chosen course secretly hoping to do the same. But while the eldest son has a desire, he has no endurance, talent, and determined goals. For locals who pay attention during the boy’s formative years, the second child seems to have the greatest share of blessings for all three, earning respect from elementary school through college in various athletic and scholastic endeavors. He is a “good” child, not an intelligent altar like the other two. Therefore, it was followed that he was a favorite of the townspeople and the elderly-but all of that above. Underneath there is a more threatening nuance, manifested in the unending bullying of his younger brother and cousin.

But this essay is about Thom …

At an early age, perhaps as a fourth grader, Thom took the trumpet that his middle brother had discarded. It is a direct love affair. At first he could hardly blow a horn that seemed too big for him, but because of his perseverance quickly learned his technique. Two years and many lessons later he blew a trumpet in a class band. But he did not stop there, he went through junior and senior high school, continuing his lessons and honing and perfecting his technique. Somewhere along the line he bought a former King Trumpet built in 1937, which has been renewed and still owned today. In the second year, he and four contemporaries rearranged a sixteen dance band called Anthonys Mad and got an assistant young music director to become their mentor and patron. Why a protector? Well, it turns out that the high school marching and concert bands did not approve of radical new endeavors when the boys transformed The Anthonys Mad into a true jazz band even though young musicians became a mainstay in his bands. Fifths play everywhere they get a chance, marching band, band band, concert band – you give the name a chance, they jump to it. For three years, Anthonys Mad played throughout the local area for promotions and other special occasions-once for a university in another state-and as they slashed two albums. They managed to perform and sell their albums to pay for transportation, buy a band stand, and get a tuxedo-the last one is actually free from a local clothing store. Thom’s senior year they placed second in the state jazz band final just because the trombone section let Anthonys down while doing mandatory charts. They took the top spot in the two optional charts played by each band, but unfortunately were third in the mandatory number.

Before Thom left high school, he and a trumpeter who played his classmates were asked to join Ger Widmer’s Rube Band, an unfamiliar group of mature adult musicians who wore crazy clothes and played parades and salos all over including Mardi Gras. Sometimes the Rubers are said to be too worried. Simply by saying, the boy’s parents are a little uncomfortable with them hanging out with a bunch of rowdy old men. While still in high school, Thom also studied French Horn and Baritone Horn, which are sometimes played in concert bands. BTW on the second instrument concert program ters At The Note Turned Blue

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